#thankful4KMUZ: Here’s How You Can Show It

cropped-KMUZWebHeader_2015A#thankful4KMUZ: Here’s How You Can Show It

KMUZ, like many radio stations depends on listener contributions to continue generate excellent programming.  When you make a donation to our station, you are showing how #thankful4KMUZ you actually are, by contributing to a cause that is now been on the air for five years.  You can make a donation by going to kmuz.org and following the PayPal links, or by calling 503-990-6601 starting tomorrow – October 1st – and pledging your support to our station – all the way to October 7th.

As part of our usual Pledge Drive, anyone who donates $50 will receive a black KMUZ Mug.  Drink coffee in style, and show your support for your favorite community radio station.

temp-coverFor listeners of Mid-Valley Mutations, we like to sweeten the deal.  For anyone who makes a donation of any amount to KMUZ, we will give them a digital copy of our new album, Mid-Valley Mutations Vol. 1.  This is a collection of some of the live moments from our program since May of this year.  This includes live performances by Paco Jones, devils/club, Guyve, Entresol, Entrail & Fiasco, a fine gathering of artists that have all contributed to this program.  And all you have to do is make any kind of donation you KMUZ you can afford.  I will e-mail you your digital album as a thank you gift for listening to the show.

a1714948314_16For contributions of $25 or more, you will get to choose from one of three gifts, curtesy of Personal Archives, No Part Of It & WTBC: Wanting To Be Cool In Beautiful Anywhere, Anywhen, including albums by Thollem, Bob Bucko Jr.Sex Funeral, Illusion of SafetyArvo Zylo / Dental Work and physical copies of The Shindig Shakedown, a gift that was largely available at Austin’s 40th Birthday Party.

For a contribution of $35 or more, you will get a vinyl copy of the Blood Rhythms Assembly LP, with a hand-made cover.  There is a limited number of this LP, so please make your contribution soon.

I could go on and on about how important these Pledge Drives are, so let me just say a few more words.  Without listener donations, KMUZ may have trouble paying the rent in the future.  We would not only loose all the great shows, but the physical space we use to make all of this happen.  This is why we need your money.  Radio is loose ground every day, and for us to have made it five years is quite impressive.  But to make it much longer, we’ll need money, and we’ll need your support.

If everyone who listens to my program were to contribute even $5, that would be enough to keep Mid-Valley Mutations and KMUZ on the air.  Let’s hope that we can raise that much – and more.  Make your donation now, and mention that you would like to support Mid-Valley Mutations (and which perk you are interested in).  Let’s make radio in the mid-valley powerful again.

 

Facebook Post: 2016-09-24T15:43:53

Cottage Grove hasn’t changed much since I left in 1994. Even with the technological and cultural shifts over time, the buildings and the people are all stuck in the 90’s, with the addition of dispensaries and Trump signs. Our old house on Thornton Lane just looks more run down, and the town seems saggier and worn-out. Part of me wanted to take pictures, but even those would have felt dishonest and misrepresentative of what I remember, and how I feel about that place. Could any photo, any status update – any communicated thought – could that live up to the memory of your High School experience?

Facebook Post: 2016-09-24T09:21:22

“To all the kids with…

Headgear and braces and freckly faces
Glasses and acne and foster care families
Eating disorders who sit on the corners
Bikes with a basket and pants with elastic

Retards and spastics and Star Trek fanatics
And guys in gymnastics with lives that are tragic
Chess club contenders with speculative genders
Friends they imagine with matching pajamas.

Mom loves us all.”

– The Vandals.

Facebook Post: 2016-09-23T17:56:03

In light of the recent diagnosis, I rewatched this piece. This is how I want to remember Terry Jones. A brilliant physical comedian who is abstract and surreal and very, very sympathetic.

Python means the world to me. His mind really shaped it heavily. It’s sad to know that he is no longer able to make new amazing things for the world. Hopefully, I can remember what incredible things he left behind.

Facebook Post: 2016-09-20T07:21:49

My copy of Wizard of Oz has been missing for a while. And, it doesn’t seem to get the yearly TV treatment it once got. I guess Amazon has it streaming, but there’s something about this movie that “feels” broadcast to me, even when I know it isn’t.

Maybe it is silly to say that this is the greatest film ever made? I don’t care. It is. It pushes all the right buttons, it makes me cry, the songs are memorable, and there’s so many myths and rumors about it that it “feels” like the right thing to say. What could be better? Nothing in the last 70 plus years can match this magic.

Anyway, I now have a copy again. And I will watch it once a year, at least. It’s not the same as watching it on TV every year, but hopefully Marla can tolerate me watching this and bawling once in a while. She’s already used to me crying over the Popeye Musical when I make her watch that with me.

Facebook Post: 2016-09-19T07:40:36

When I was growing up, a 40 year old person was an adult, and both older and younger people were chastised if they didn’t respect that an adult could positively contribute to the world around us.

Now, I’m treated like a child, belittled by both the younger and older generations because I am out of touch with what’s really going on.

Why do I want to be a decent human again?

Facebook Post: 2016-09-17T14:32:05

Marla turned me onto this article, and she is usually the one that I have these kinds of conversations with, because she is very articulate, and very astute, too.

I have wrestled with this, as a fan of old movies (Holiday Inn), old books (Robert E. Howard), old records (Al Jolson), and old comics (anything where they draw “female” superheroes), many of which are outrightly sexist, racist, or what-have-you. (Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tiki Culture, and The Angry Samoans all come to mind as Problematic Culture that I really, really love.)

I try to question when things are not appropriate, and make sure my privilege as a white guy isn’t, “Well, actually…”ing the younger generations to death with my insistence that The Who are great (when they’re really just a bunch of old White Guys who demean women and wish they were teenagers). Robert Crumb is hard to really like, because of these reasons, but I love reading his comics anyway. Sometimes, BECAUSE they portray points of view I find hard to reconcile.

I think this is a great article that tackles this notion head on. I don’t want to say, “Let’s promote racist things because we can discuss them intellectually and that makes racism okay,” but rather, “I think we can all learn from the imperfections of humanity, ourselves included, and maybe our own privilege can offer us a chance to discuss these things intellectually, and see what we can gain from our narrow points of view.”

I just want to be up front about the fact that the things I like are not for everyone, and that I hope that doesn’t paint me as awful as the things I love. I just hope I’m honest with myself about how these things aren’t always acceptable by modern standards.

Anyway: this was a good read. I recommend it.
http://www.socialjusticeleague.net/2011/09/how-to-be-a-fan-of-problematic-things/

Facebook Post: 2016-09-12T17:20:49

“[…]

My great-grandparents said that my grandparents were lazy, their culture was poor, and that they never understand hardship.

My grandparents said that my parents were lazy, their culture was poor, and that they never understand hardship.

My parents said that we were lazy, our culture was poor, and that we never understand hardship.

The cycle of abuse ends with my generation.”

Facebook Post: 2016-09-09T15:41:56

Tourist day walking around, ending at The John Handcock Building. This is the tallest building I’ve ever been in, and the view is incredible. We also sacrificed a single dollar to a street gent, which seems fair considering how many other times people have tried to rip us off so far.

Four days in a row, and boy are my dogs barking. Time for vodka.

Facebook Post: 2016-09-08T20:57:07

Holy Cats. The Art Institute of Chicago is pretty fun, too. And there’s a ton to see that isn’t featured in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. If I’m not careful I’ll just upload the entire roll. After almost six hours we had to call it quits, and I feel like I saw half of it.

I guess a return trip is in order.

Facebook Post: 2016-09-07T16:02:18

I’m sorry to say that I will not be returning to Salem, and instead will be moving into The Field Museum. Marla and I will live in the conservation exhibit, as no one seems to go there but us. I’ll miss you all, but I can’t leave this place. I’m giving up the rest of my life for this place, because it is incredible.

Do you think Sue is single?

Facebook Post: 2016-09-05T14:43:41

Made it to Reckless Records, and scored some pretty great stuff. Dickie Goodman/Flying Saucer, Bob & Ray, Spike Jones, Les Paul and Mary Ford, Dr. Demento, Edmond de Luca, Proctor and Bergman, Nichols & May, Yma Sumac AND the WNUF Halloween Special TV28 record.

Plus Ash Corbin gifted me a bat-shaped record, Circus Royale AND the Chimpmunk Punk LP.

Hell fuckin’ yeah.